CompTIA Security+ Question L-10

A small company can only afford to buy an all-in-one wireless router/switch. The company has 3 wireless BYOD users and 2 web servers without wireless access. Which of the following should the company configure to protect the servers from the user devices? (Select TWO).

A. Deny incoming connections to the outside router interface.
B. Change the default HTTP port
C. Implement EAP-TLS to establish mutual authentication
D. Disable the physical switch ports
E. Create a server VLAN
F. Create an ACL to access the server

Answer: E,F

Explanation:
We can protect the servers from the user devices by separating them into separate VLANs (virtual local area networks).

The network device in the question is a router/switch. We can use the router to allow access from devices in one VLAN to the servers in the other VLAN. We can configure an ACL (Access Control List) on the router to determine who is able to access the server.

In computer networking, a single layer-2 network may be partitioned to create multiple distinct broadcast domains, which are mutually isolated so that packets can only pass between them via one or more routers; such a domain is referred to as a virtual local area network, virtual LAN or VLAN. This is usually achieved on switch or router devices. Simpler devices only support partitioning on a port level (if at all), so sharing VLANs across devices requires running dedicated cabling for each VLAN. More sophisticated devices can mark packets through tagging, so that a single interconnect (trunk) may be used to transport data for multiple VLANs. Grouping hosts with a common set of requirements regardless of their physical location by VLAN can greatly simplify network design. A VLAN has the same attributes as a physical local area network (LAN), but it allows for end stations to be grouped together more easily even if they are not on the same network switch. The network described in this question is a DMZ, not a VLAN.

CompTIA Security+ Question J-67

Which of the following is a step in deploying a WPA2-Enterprise wireless network?

A. Install a token on the authentication server
B. Install a DHCP server on the authentication server
C. Install an encryption key on the authentication server
D. Install a digital certificate on the authentication server

Answer: D

Explanation:
When setting up a wireless network, you’ll find two very different modes of Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) security, which apply to both the WPA and WPA2 versions. The easiest to setup is the Personal mode, technically called the Pre-Shared Key (PSK) mode. It doesn’t require anything beyond the wireless router or access points (APs) and uses a single passphrase or password for all users/devices. The other is the Enterprise mode —which should be used by businesses and organizations—and is also known as the RADIUS, 802.1X, 802.11i, or EAP mode. It provides better security and key management, and supports other enterprise-type functionality, such as VLANs and NAP. However, it requires an external authentication server, called a Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) server to handle the 802.1X authentication of users.

To help you better understand the process of setting up WPA/WPA2-Enterprise and 802.1X, here’s the basic overall steps: Choose, install, and configure a RADIUS server, or use a hosted service.

Create a certificate authority (CA), so you can issue and install a digital certificate onto the RADIUS server, which may be done as a part of the RADIUS server installation and configuration. Alternatively, you could purchase a digital certificate from a public CA, such as GoDaddy or Verisign, so you don’t have to install the server certificate on all the clients. If using EAP-TLS, you’d also create digital certificates for each end-user. On the server, populate the RADIUS client database with the IP address and shared secret for each AP. On the server, populate user data with usernames and passwords for each end-user. On each AP, configure the security for WPA/WPA2-Enterprise and input the RADIUS server IP address and the shared secret you created for that particular AP. On each Wi-Fi computer and device, configure the security for WPA/WPA2-Enterprise and set the 802.1X authentication settings.

CompTIA Security+ Question I-49

A user has plugged in a wireless router from home with default configurations into a network jack at the office. This is known as:

A. an evil twin.
B. an IV attack.
C. a rogue access point.
D. an unauthorized entry point.

Answer: C

Explanation:
A rogue access point is a wireless access point that should not be there. In this question, the wireless router has been connected to the corporate network without authorization. Therefore, it is a rogue access point. A rogue access point is a wireless access point that has either been installed on a secure company network without explicit authorization from a local network administrator, or has been created to allow a hacker to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack. Rogue access points of the first kind can pose a security threat to large organizations with many employees, because anyone with access to the premises can install (maliciously or non-maliciously) an inexpensive wireless router that can potentially allow access to a secure network to unauthorized parties. Rogue access points of the second kind target networks that do not employ mutual authentication (client-server server-client) and may be used in conjunction with a rogue RADIUS server, depending on security configuration of the target network. To prevent the installation of rogue access points, organizations can install wireless intrusion prevention systems to monitor the radio spectrum for unauthorized access points.

CompTIA Security+ Question H-76

Ann, the network administrator, has learned from the helpdesk that employees are accessing the wireless network without entering their domain credentials upon connection. Once the connection is made, they cannot reach any internal resources, while wired network connections operate smoothly. Which of the following is MOST likely occurring?

A. A user has plugged in a personal access point at their desk to connect to the network wirelessly.
B. The company is currently experiencing an attack on their internal DNS servers.
C. The company’s WEP encryption has been compromised and WPA2 needs to be implemented instead.
D. An attacker has installed an access point nearby in an attempt to capture company information.

Answer: D

Explanation:
The question implies that users should be required to enter their domain credentials upon connection to the wireless network. The fact that they are connecting to a wireless network without being prompted for their domain credentials and they are unable to access network resources suggests they are connecting to a rogue wireless network. A rogue access point is a wireless access point that has either been installed on a secure company network without explicit authorization from a local network administrator, or has been created to allow a hacker to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack. Rogue access points of the first kind can pose a security threat to large organizations with many employees, because anyone with access to the premises can install (maliciously or non-maliciously) an inexpensive wireless router that can potentially allow access to a secure network to unauthorized parties. Rogue access points of the second kind target networks that do not employ mutual authentication (client-server server-client) and may be used in conjunction with a rogue RADIUS server, depending on security configuration of the target network. To prevent the installation of rogue access points, organizations can install wireless intrusion prevention systems to monitor the radio spectrum for unauthorized access points.

CompTIA Security+ Question D-68

A computer supply company is located in a building with three wireless networks. The system security team implemented a quarterly security scan and saw the following.
SSIDStateChannelLevel
Computer AreUs1connected170dbm
Computer AreUs2connected580dbm
Computer AreUs3connected375dbm
Computer AreUs4connected695dbm
Which of the following is this an example of?

A. Rogue access point
B. Near field communication
C. Jamming
D. Packet sniffing

Answer: A

Explanation:
The question states that the building has three wireless networks. However, the scan is showing four wireless networks with the SSIDs: Computer AreUs1 , Computer AreUs2 , Computer AreUs3 and Computer AreUs4. Therefore, one of these wireless networks probably shouldn’t be there. This is an example of a rogue access point. A rogue access point is a wireless access point that has either been installed on a secure company network without explicit authorization from a local network administrator, or has been created to allow a hacker to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack. Rogue access points of the first kind can pose a security threat to large organizations with many employees, because anyone with access to the premises can install (maliciously or non-maliciously) an inexpensive wireless router that can potentially allow access to a secure network to unauthorized parties. Rogue access points of the second kind target networks that do not employ mutual authentication (client-server server-client) and may be used in conjunction with a rogue RADIUS server, depending on security configuration of the target network. To prevent the installation of rogue access points, organizations can install wireless intrusion prevention systems to monitor the radio spectrum for unauthorized access points.

CompTIA Security+ Question D-25

Ann, the network administrator, is receiving reports regarding a particular wireless network in the building. The network was implemented for specific machines issued to the developer department, but the developers are stating that they are having connection issues as well as slow bandwidth. Reviewing the wireless router’s logs, she sees that devices not belonging to the developers are connecting to the access point. Which of the following would BEST alleviate the developer’s reports?

A. Configure the router so that wireless access is based upon the connecting device’s hardware address.
B. Modify the connection’s encryption method so that it is using WEP instead of WPA2.
C. Implement connections via secure tunnel with additional software on the developer’s computers.
D. Configure the router so that its name is not visible to devices scanning for wireless networks.

Answer: A

Explanation:
MAC addresses are also known as an Ethernet hardware address (EHA), hardware address or physical address. Enabling MAC filtering would allow for a WAP to restrict or allow access based on the hardware address of the device.

CompTIA Security+ Question B-74

After entering the following information into a SOHO wireless router, a mobile device’s user reports being unable to connect to the network:
PERMIT 0A: D1: FA. B1: 03: 37
DENY 01: 33: 7F: AB: 10: AB
Which of the following is preventing the device from connecting?

A. WPA2-PSK requires a supplicant on the mobile device.
B. Hardware address filtering is blocking the device.
C. TCP/IP Port filtering has been implemented on the SOHO router.
D. IP address filtering has disabled the device from connecting.

Answer: B

Explanation:
MAC filtering allows you to include or exclude computers and devices based on their MAC address.

CompTIA Security+ Question B-14

Which of the following is where an unauthorized device is found allowing access to a network?

A. Bluesnarfing
B. Rogue access point
C. Honeypot
D. IV attack

Answer: B

Explanation:
A rogue access point is a wireless access point that has either been installed on a secure company network without explicit authorization from a local network administrator, or has been created to allow a hacker to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack. Rogue access points of the first kind can pose a security threat to large organizations with many employees, because anyone with access to the premises can install (maliciously or non-maliciously) an inexpensive wireless router that can potentially allow access to a secure network to unauthorized parties. Rogue access points of the second kind target networks that do not employ mutual authentication (client-server server-client) and may be used in conjunction with a rogue RADIUS server, depending on security configuration of the target network. To prevent the installation of rogue access points, organizations can install wireless intrusion prevention systems to monitor the radio spectrum for unauthorized access points.

CompTIA Network+ Question C-77

A company that was previously running on a wired network is performing office-wide upgrades. A department with older desktop PC’s that do not have wireless capabilities must be migrated to the new network, ensuring that all computers are operating on a single network. Assuming CAT5e cables are available, which of the following network devices should a network technician use to connect all the devices to the wireless network?

A. Wireless bridge
B. VPN concentrator
C. Default WAP
D. Wireless router

Correct Answer: D

CompTIA A+ 220-902 Question J-48

A user has just purchased a wireless router for their home. Which of the following should be done to BEST secure the router from unauthorized access? (Select TWO).

A. Change router default logins
B. Change the security settings on their computer
C. Set encryption on the router
D. Update router firmware
E. Change the encryption on the computers wireless adapter

Correct Answer: AC

Explanation:
First change default router logins to avoid guesswork by hackers. Set encryption on the router using WPA and/or WPA2.